Citizens Delivers Random Acts of Kindness to 425 People

September 18-22, 2017 was Minnesota Bankers Community Impact Week, in which Citizens Bank Minnesota was a proud participant. Across the state, 95 banks and over 250 branches joined forces to serve their local communities. Citizens chose to split its staff of 94 into 13 teams and perform Random Acts of Kindness throughout the communities they serve. Citizens employees were able to impact 11 organizations and over 425 individuals. Some of the acts performed were providing healthy snacks to Davita Dialysis Center in New Ulm, serving hot dogs to the community in Lafayette and bringing a football jersey along with snacks to a local student who was recently hurt while playing football.
Launched by the Minnesota Bankers Association, the Community Impact Week creates an opportunity for banks to highlight the many volunteer opportunities available to help build stronger local communities. Citizens and their employees were proud to be a part of this effort!

Check out our video to see the businesses and individuals that Citizens impacted this year!

Harvest Safety – Part 2 of 2

TRACTOR AND SUNSETAvoid Harvesting Hazards. Know the drill. Knowing how to identify hazards is only the first step. Once you identify them, you have to learn to manage them safely or avoid them altogether. Stop and think about possible hazards while you’re operating the equipment. Be alert. Ask questions. Here are a few serious harvesting hazards to avoid:
• Avoid entanglement. Every combine or baler gets a plugged intake area occasionally. This area is also known as a pull-in point, and it can grab you in an instant. To avoid entanglement:
− Operate the equipment with care and attention.
− Ensure all protective guards and shields are securely in place.
− Clear plugged equipment only after the power is turned off and the key is in your pocket.
− Don’t overestimate your ability to react – entanglement injuries happen very quickly.
− Decrease the incidence of plugged machines through regular maintenance, late-season
weed control, and by operating during optimal conditions.
− In wet field conditions, wait a few hours or an extra day, if possible, to reduce plugging.
− If you must harvest in marginal conditions, expect crops to plug the equipment and allow extra time to unplug it.

• Don’t slip up. Most people recognize the entanglement hazard. Few realize that many more injuries are related to slips and falls around farm machines. During an average workday, you might have to mount and dismount from the combine dozens of times. The top of an average combine is 12 to 16 feet high. The operator’s platform is usually 6 to 8 feet high. Falls from these heights can cause serious injuries. If you are fatigued or careless, the likelihood of a fall dramatically increases.

Then there’s the slip factor. Ladders and platforms are often painted metal. They’re
slippery in normal conditions – treacherous when wet, muddy, icy or coated in crop
residue.

To prevent painful falls:
− Keep platforms free of tools or other objects.
− Clean ladders, steps and platforms regularly.
− Wear well-fitting, comfortable shoes with non slip soles.
− Use the grab bars when mounting or dismounting.
− Find a stable position from which to refuel or perform maintenance.
− Use three points of contact when getting in or out of machinery – one hand/two feet or
two hands/ one foot.
− Don’t underestimate the impact of fatigue, stress, drugs, alcohol, or age on your stability.

The Last Word
Harvest is a productive time. The pressure may be exhilarating, but it also creates serious stress. This can only mean one thing: an increased risk of injury. To prevent injury and reap the benefits of the harvest you’re working so hard at; take responsibility for your own safety. Injuries happen when you take shortcuts in performing routine tasks, work while mentally or physically fatigued, or fail to follow safety guidelines.

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Safety Up! – On Harvest Safety

TRACTOR AND SUNSET
(Part 1 of a 2-Part Post)
Harvest is hectic. Racing daylight and rain clouds can be seriously stressful. Time means money when yields are at risk. As a result, harvest is the peak season for agriculture-related injuries and fatalities.

When you’re in a rush, it’s tempting to bypass simple safety procedures that might slow you down. But taking the extra time can be a lifesaver. So ease up. Take responsibility for your own safety. Get trained for each new task before you get started. Be alert for hazards and figure out how to manage them – remove any unnecessary risks ahead of time, and learn to manage the risks that can’t be removed. Know the job. Know the hazards. Know the drill.

Get the equipment ready. The majority of severe farm tragedies involve machinery. Make sure yours is in good working condition. Be sure pre-season maintenance and repairs are handled several weeks before harvest. Also make sure you are in good condition. You take pride in your ability to work long and hard. You’re happy to burn the midnight oil in pursuit of a goal – in this case, a successful harvest. The reality is that fatigue, drowsiness and illness contribute to field mishaps. To ensure you’ll be around to see the last of the grain go into the bin, get plenty of sleep. Take regular breaks. Wear comfortable, close fitting clothing and sturdy, protective shoes. When you do field work, always let someone know where you are and check in regularly.

Little Person Alert. Keep children safely away from farm machinery, including grain
transportation equipment. Tragedies occur far too easily when children end up in the path of equipment from which the operator’s view is restricted.

Big, Mean Harvesting Machines. Know the hazards. Harvesting equipment is designed to cut, pull and separate things, and it does so very effectively. Unfortunately, it won’t discriminate between you and the crop. Get caught in its clutches and you could be tangled, wrapped, pulled, run over, cut up or worse. Learn about the dangers ahead of time so you can avoid them while you’re in the field. When you’re working, slow down and think about the potential hazards of each new task before you begin.

How Quick are You? At 1000 RPM, a PTO shaft will entangle at four yards per second. An average measured reaction time on an adult male is about .2 seconds. So by the time you react to the pull of the PTO, it has already pulled you or your clothing almost a yard. Guards anyone?

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Watch for Part 2 of this blog to be posted next week!

 

Equifax Announces Data Breach

Last week, Equifax, one of the nation’s three largest credit bureaus, disclosed that it was subject to a massive data breach, potentially impacting approximately 143 million U.S. consumers.

We’re sure you have questions. For answers, you can go to www.equifaxsecurity2017.com or call 1-866-447-7559. The Equifax call center is open every day (including weekends) from 7:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. Eastern time.

 A number of experts also advise consumers to place a credit freeze on their credit reports, if they believe they are at risk of identity theft. If you would like to place a security freeze on your Equifax credit information, please visit www.freeze.equifax.com and follow the instructions provided.

This is being provided for informational purposes only. Citizens Bank Minnesota is not making recommendations of action or inaction. It is important for you to consider what may be the best option for you.

Citizens Offers Identity Theft Protection

As we have seen, criminals continually find ways to steal personal information and perpetrate fraud. Citizens Bank Minnesota does offer Deluxe Provent® Identity Theft Protection service for only $4.99/month. You can enroll in this service and receive your first month FREE! To learn more about this service and to enroll, please click the link below.

Deluxe Provent® Identity Theft Protection

As always, if you have any questions please give Citizens Connection a call at
1-800-549-0194

WooHoo! Contest

WooHoo CONTEST

We’re Giving Away $1,500 in Prizes!

1 – $500 Visa Gift Card

10- $100 Visa Gift Cards

We’re introducing WooHoo! Banking® and with that comes our exciting WooHoo! Contest! Every 2 weeks, from September 5, 2017 to December 31, 2017, Citizens Bank Minnesota will post a new WooHoo! question on our website, and also have the question and answer forms in our lobbies.

Simply submit a correct answer via the electronic question or on the paper form to be automatically entered to win! You have the opportunity to be entered up to 9 times if you answer all questions correctly!

All of the answers can be found on the corresponding product page of our website, or come into any of our locations and our employees will give you an answer card that explains the WooHoo! product for that question.

Are you ready to play?  Click here for official rules and to PLAY NOW!

Renters Insurance For College Students

Renters Insurance for College Students

Renters Insurance Should Be Considered For College Students Living on Their Own
College students renting an off-campus apartment or house while away at school should consider purchasing renters insurance to protect their personal property, such as a computer, television, stereo, bicycle or furniture in the event that it is damaged, destroyed or stolen.
Even if a student is a dependent under his or her parent’s insurance, the student’s personal property may not be covered. Parents should check their policy or contact their insurance agent to see if renters insurance is right for their son or daughter who is away at school.

What is Renters Insurance?
Renters insurance protects your personal property against damage or loss, and insures you in case someone is injured while on your property. If you live in a rented apartment, house or condominium, your landlord’s insurance does not cover your personal property in the event that it is stolen or damaged as a result of a fire, theft or other unexpected circumstance.
College students living in off-campus housing are ideal candidates for needing renters insurance, since many students bring thousands of dollars’ worth of personal items, such as electronics, a computer, textbooks, clothes, furniture, and a bicycle, with them to school. It is the renter’s responsibility to provide coverage for these valuable items.

Basic Options
Most renters’ insurance policies provide two basic types of coverage: personal property and liability. Personal property coverage pays to repair or replace personal belongings if they are damaged, destroyed, or stolen. This is the most commonly purchased renters’ policy. Liability insurance provides coverage against a claim or lawsuit resulting from bodily injury or property damage to others caused by an accident while on the policyholder’s property.

Shop for the Right Coverage
Another important factor to look for when shopping for renters insurance is “actual cash value” vs. “replacement cost” coverage.
Actual cash-value coverage will reimburse the renter for the cost of the personal property at the time of the claim, minus the deductible. It’s important to account for depreciation when considering this coverage option. For example, if a stereo system were stolen from an apartment fi ve years after the stereo was purchased, the policyholder would be reimbursed for the current value of the system.
Replacement cost coverage, on the other hand, will reimburse the full value of the new stereo system after you purchase the new system and submit your receipts. While the up-front cost is greater, you are more likely to receive accurate compensation for your possessions.

Parents’ Homeowners Insurance
As a parent with your own homeowners’ policy, you may want to contact your agent and ask if your child will be covered while they are away at school. Some companies might still cover your child’s belongings under your policy depending on their age and student status. However, you will still be responsible for your deductible under your policy.
Other Points of Interest Regarding Renters Insurance
When a claim is reported, the insurance company will ask the policyholder for proof of purchase for all items reported on the claim. A comprehensive list of possessions, including purchase prices, model numbers and serial numbers, will suffice. It also is a good idea to take photos or video footage of any personal possessions for documentation, making sure it is stored in a secure, off-site location.

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

2017 Citizens Scholarship Winners

Danielle Hogue, a home school graduate, and Levi Stelljes, a graduate of Minnesota Valley Lutheran High School, were recently presented with the Citizens Bank Minnesota’s seventeenth annual scholarship awards.  These scholarships are part of the Community Bankers Scholarship Program TM.  Both of these students received a $1,000.00 scholarship that is renewable for a potential value of $4,000.00 over four years of post-secondary education.

Amy Denn, a graduate of Madelia High School, and Vivian Riggin, a graduate of Lakeville South High School, were the recipients of a $500.00 Citizens Bank Minnesota scholarship.  The scholarships are offered through a random drawing to graduating high school seniors from the New Ulm and Lakeville area who have completed the Citizens Real Life Skillz online classes.

Each year, Citizens awards two or more high school seniors with scholarships. Applicants must be graduating high school, plan to attend a four year university, have an active Citizens checking account and complete the Citizens Real Life Skillz courses. The scholarship program was developed to support our belief in the youth and their potential to make a difference in our community. Citizens is proud to invest in their futures by promoting education and excellence.

Grad photo Hogue, Danielle

 

Danielle, daughter of Jeff and Shelly Hogue, will be attending Bethel University this fall, pursuing a degree in nursing and psychology.

 

 

Grad phot Stelljes, Levi

 

Levi, son of Ross and Laura Stelljes, will be attending Martin Luther this fall, pursuing a degree in secondary math and elementary education.

 

 

Grad photo Denn, Amy

 

Amy, daughter of Mark Denn and Lori Denn, will be attending Augustana University – Sioux Falls, SD this fall, pursuing a degree in biology/pre-med.

 

 

 

Grad photo Riggin, Vivian

 

Vivian, daughter of Julie and Bill Shea, will be attending Minnesota State University, Mankato this coming fall, pursuing a degree in elementary education.

 

 

 

For more information about the scholarship visit: https://www.citizensmn.bank/personal/real-life-investors

By: Lori Dummer, Marketing Assistant/Youth Club Coordinator

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