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Renters Insurance For College Students

Renters Insurance for College Students

Renters Insurance Should Be Considered For College Students Living on Their Own
College students renting an off-campus apartment or house while away at school should consider purchasing renters insurance to protect their personal property, such as a computer, television, stereo, bicycle or furniture in the event that it is damaged, destroyed or stolen.
Even if a student is a dependent under his or her parent’s insurance, the student’s personal property may not be covered. Parents should check their policy or contact their insurance agent to see if renters insurance is right for their son or daughter who is away at school.

What is Renters Insurance?
Renters insurance protects your personal property against damage or loss, and insures you in case someone is injured while on your property. If you live in a rented apartment, house or condominium, your landlord’s insurance does not cover your personal property in the event that it is stolen or damaged as a result of a fire, theft or other unexpected circumstance.
College students living in off-campus housing are ideal candidates for needing renters insurance, since many students bring thousands of dollars’ worth of personal items, such as electronics, a computer, textbooks, clothes, furniture, and a bicycle, with them to school. It is the renter’s responsibility to provide coverage for these valuable items.

Basic Options
Most renters’ insurance policies provide two basic types of coverage: personal property and liability. Personal property coverage pays to repair or replace personal belongings if they are damaged, destroyed, or stolen. This is the most commonly purchased renters’ policy. Liability insurance provides coverage against a claim or lawsuit resulting from bodily injury or property damage to others caused by an accident while on the policyholder’s property.

Shop for the Right Coverage
Another important factor to look for when shopping for renters insurance is “actual cash value” vs. “replacement cost” coverage.
Actual cash-value coverage will reimburse the renter for the cost of the personal property at the time of the claim, minus the deductible. It’s important to account for depreciation when considering this coverage option. For example, if a stereo system were stolen from an apartment fi ve years after the stereo was purchased, the policyholder would be reimbursed for the current value of the system.
Replacement cost coverage, on the other hand, will reimburse the full value of the new stereo system after you purchase the new system and submit your receipts. While the up-front cost is greater, you are more likely to receive accurate compensation for your possessions.

Parents’ Homeowners Insurance
As a parent with your own homeowners’ policy, you may want to contact your agent and ask if your child will be covered while they are away at school. Some companies might still cover your child’s belongings under your policy depending on their age and student status. However, you will still be responsible for your deductible under your policy.
Other Points of Interest Regarding Renters Insurance
When a claim is reported, the insurance company will ask the policyholder for proof of purchase for all items reported on the claim. A comprehensive list of possessions, including purchase prices, model numbers and serial numbers, will suffice. It also is a good idea to take photos or video footage of any personal possessions for documentation, making sure it is stored in a secure, off-site location.

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

2017 Spring Planting

spring planting

Well it’s that time of the year again! Spring is a very busy time – planters are out of the shed, and farmers are eager to put the seed in the ground.  They are trying to get a lot of acres planted in a short amount of time, putting long hours in.  Please remember to slow down and be safe out there.

With April 11th past us, farmers will have full crop insurance coverage and replant coverage for their 2017 corn crop, as that date is the earliest date RMA allows farmers to plant corn to receive replant coverage. (April 21st is the earliest planting date for soybeans to receive full crop insurance coverage and replant coverage.) The 2” soil temperature read 50 degrees at the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca, MN on April 14, 2017, which is the temperature it takes to germinate corn seed.  With the wet forecast that is predicted farmers are going to be chomping at the bit to get into the field any chance they get.  Keep in mind that it can take three weeks for corn to germinate at 50-55 degrees soil temperature and only 10-12 days at 60 degrees.  That being said, try to be patient and not mud in your crop.

July 15th is the acreage reporting deadline for crop insurance.  I know this sounds like a long time away, but with planting and then spraying, the time slips away from you.  Please remember to go to the FSA offices and certify your acres first. Then bring your FSA 578’s to your crop insurance agent to report your acres.

When you’re sitting in the planter, it gives you a lot of time to reflect on your farming operation.  Now is the time to evaluate planting, spraying, or harvesting equipment, whether it needs replacing or upgrading to be more successful.  Coming off of a wet fall reminds us where we may have drainage problems in our fields.  Well drained fields play a huge factor in your crop yields, determines the planting conditions in spring and the ease of harvesting the crop in the fall.  Every operation is different.  Take the time this summer and sit down with your lender to determine the feasibility, the debt service, and pay back of your projects/purchases.  We always work hard to put together the best loan package that fits your needs.

Nobody knows what Mother Nature will bring us this year, but here’s to a safe and productive 2017!

By: Nick Peterson, Asst. Vice President

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Renters Insurance/Tenant Insurance

Renters Insurance post

There are many individuals and businesses out there that own multiple dwellings and rent them out to tenants.  These individuals and businesses will want to cover these dwellings under a dwelling/fire and/or a commercial policy if it fits.

This policy will cover the dwelling itself, any detached structures, personal property in the dwelling that is owned by the owner can have coverage added, loss of rents and landlord liability and medical payments to others coverage.  In the case of a wind storm, a hail storm, etc. the structure and personal property that is damaged would then be covered under such policy.

The agent will do a replacement cost of the dwelling and any detached structures to ensure that they are covering the dwelling at 80-100% of replacement cost value.  The replacement cost value is the cost it would be today to replace the dwelling with like materials and labor.  The agent and insured want to verify that these numbers are adequate, otherwise, in the case of a claim and the house is underinsured, there can be a coinsurance penalty.

When looking at the other side of things and who is actually occupying the dwelling(s), the tenant should have a renter’s policy in place.  This renter’s policy will cover the personal property of the renter, additional living expense and loss of rents coverage, personal liability and medical payments.

It should be both the owner’s duty and the renter’s duty to make certain that they both have the correct coverages in place.  Also, the owner should confirm that the rental contract requires that the tenant must carry renter’s insurance in the case of a claim so if there is a claim, a fire for instance, and the tenant is found liable for the fire, the renter’s policy would come into place for coverage.  The owner does not want to have the misfortune of having a claim by the tenant who has no coverage and who does damage to their dwelling.

In short, if you are a landlord, make sure that you and your tenants have the necessary insurance coverage in place and that you ask for renewal policies each year to have on file.

By: Nick Hage, Citizens Agency Manager/Insurance Agent

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Do I Need Renters Insurance in College?

renter-insurance-in-college

Updated: July 2016

When you’re packing for college, you may be thinking about your class schedule and late night pizzas with friends. Someone making off with your laptop or a dorm fire are probably not what you’re envisioning about the campus experience. But since you may be bringing some expensive stuff with you — a television, speakers, clothing and a smartphone — it’s a good idea to make sure these things are protected before you leave home, just in case.

Whether you’re living in the dorm or an off-campus apartment, it’s important to have coverage for all those things that help you keep up with classes and make your living space feel like home. How to help protect your stuff, though, typically depends on where you’re living.

Dorm Life

If you’re living in a dorm or other campus housing, your belongings may be covered under your parents’ homeowners or renters insurance policy. You’ll want to check with your agent to make sure, but the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) says that students who are younger than 26 and living on campus may be covered through their parents’ policy.

It can be a good idea to know the policy’s coverage limits for personal property. The Insurance Information Institute(III) says some policies limit coverage for belongings while they are away from the policyholder’s home. This is often referred to as “off-premises coverage.” For example, if your parents’ policy provides $100,000 worth of coverage for belongings, but limits that coverage to 10 percent for items that are off-premises, it may provide up to $10,000 for items away from their home, including belongings you bring to school.

It’s also important to note that certain items, such as a laptop, may have coverage limits. If the policy’s limits aren’t enough to cover the items you’ll be bringing to school, the III says your parents may be able to add scheduled personal property coverage, sometimes referred to as a “floater,” to their homeowners or renters insurance policy to help cover certain valuable possessions.

Off-Campus Housing

If you’ll be living in off-campus housing, the III cautions that your parents’ insurance will probably not extend to any belongings you bring with you (although you’ll want to check with your agent to be certain). Your own renters insurance policy may be a good way to help protect your belongings should they be stolen or damaged by a covered loss. (Covered events are often described as “perils” in insurance terms. Read your policy to learn what risks it may cover, such as theft or fire.)

A renters policy will also likely provide liability coverage, which may help prevent you from paying out of pocket if you are found legally responsible for someone else’s injuries or accidental damage to their property (including your landlord’s).

The III recommends asking your agent about coverage limits, as well as whether you may benefit from additional coverage for certain valuables.

Hopefully you and your stuff stay safe and sound while you’re running to and from classes, but it may be a good idea to keep a home inventory — it can be a big help if you ever need to file a claim. Knowing you have coverage for your stuff can bring some peace of mind and help you focus on a great college experience.

Article courtesy of: http://www.allstate.com

 

Replacement Cost For Your Home’s Contents

homeowners insurance

Replacement cost contents coverage pays the full replacement cost of an item, minus your deductible.

If you want to restore the comforts of your home in the event of a loss, it’s best to choose replacement cost coverage on your household contents. It could be worth hundreds, even thousands of dollars to your family.

Most homeowners insurance policies cover personal property for its actual cash value. To cover your contents for the cost to replace them – new for old –request replacement cost contents coverage.

WHAT IS ACTUAL CASH VALUE?

Actual cash value is replacement cost minus reasonable depreciation. The actual cash value of your household property is what the items are worth at the time of a loss. For example, a television set usually lasts about 10 years. If you own a 5-year-old TV, about half of its life is used up. While you would pay $800 to replace it with a new one, its actual cash value is around $400. Homeowners insurance usually pays actual cash value (after the deductible) for your damaged or stolen TV.

REPLACEMENT COST CONTENTS COVERAGE IS AVAILABLE

With replacement cost contents coverage, no deduction is made for depreciation. Your homeowners insurance pays the full replacement cost of a new item of the same kind and quality, minus the policy deductible. Most policies require that you actually replace the item before replacement cost is paid.

Ask your local independent agent about replacement cost contents coverage. It lets you recover costs up to the full amount of your contents insurance limit. For example, your 10-year-old TV has an actual cash value of $100, but it would cost $800 to replace it with a new one. With replacement cost contents coverage, you could receive the full $800 for the new TV, subject to policy conditions, deductible and content limits.

This coverage would not apply to rare or antique items, those with sentimental value, or items insured under special limits of liability.

Come to Citizens Agency and talk with one of our local agents to insure your comforts of home at appropriate values.

Article courtesy of: Cincinnati Personal Lines

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Attention Snowbirds!

arizona-state-flag

Every winter season, as soon as the temps drop, a large number of “Snowbirds” leave their Minnesota homes for the gentler climates of Arizona.  You may be familiar with this group or may even be lucky enough to be a Snowbird yourself.  The agents at Citizens Agency can now write the insurance for your Arizona seasonal homes, mobile homes, autos and golf carts.

Snowbirds have come up with some practical habits for maintaining the nest left behind. It’s important to have a checklist of items to think about when leaving your home for extending periods of time, making your migration as smooth as possible.

Essential Tips for the Nest Left Behind:

  1. Unplug all electrical appliances, except the fridge.
  2. Turn down thermostats, but not completely off. A good temperature is about 55-60 degrees depending upon where you live.
  3. Secure all water sources: turn off all faucets, make sure drains are clear and turn off the supply valve to toilets and washing machine.
  4. Don’t make your absence obvious – i.e. stop newspaper and mail delivery, use lamp timers and don’t announce it on Facebook.
  5. Forward bills and notify credit card companies so that charges don’t appear suspicious.
  6. Take care of doctor appointments and prescriptions before you go.
  7. Make sure your smoke alarms work and have fresh batteries.
  8. Ask a trusted friend or family member to check on your place periodically.
  9. Make sure your driver’s license and/or passport won’t expire while you’re gone.

By: Jen Eager, Citizens Agency CSR/Insurance Agent

Investment and insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Spring Planting – Certify Your Acres

spring planting

It is spring and soon farmers will be racking the long hours to get their crops planted. For all of the producers who carry Multiple Peril Crop Insurance (MPCI) remember that your spring planted crops have an acreage reporting date of not later than July 15th in our area. This may seem like a long way off but a combination of a later spring and busy schedules will bring up this deadline sooner than you think. I recommend that within a few days of when you finish planting your final acre you should go in to your FSA office and certify your planted acres of each crop. The same day that you certify with FSA please stop and see your crop insurance agent to also certify your acres for your MPCI coverage. When you meet with your agent you will need to have both your FSA field maps and your 578 forms. By going to FSA first you will have accurate acres and planting dates for your MPCI acreage report which will save you a lot of time in the long run.

A benefit of getting your acres reported as soon as you can in the season is that the Insurance Provider can send your Schedule of Insurance to you much earlier. This means you will have accurate information regarding your bushel and dollar coverage as well as your final premium. Having this information early in the summer undoubtedly will help you with your marketing decisions.

Have a safe and productive spring.

By: Pat Brennan, Vice-President

 

Investment and Insurance Products:

  • Are not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency.
  • Are not deposits of or guaranteed by a bank or any bank affiliate.
  • May lose value.
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