Archive for the ‘ Youth ’ Category

Citizens Bank Minnesota Awards Scholarships

Molly Hennig, a graduate of Luther Preparatory High School, and Grant Halvorson, a graduate of Lakeville South High School, were recently presented with the Citizens Bank Minnesota’s sixteenth annual scholarship awards.  These scholarships are part of the Community Bankers Scholarship Program TM.  Both of these students received a $1,000.00 scholarship that is renewable for a potential value of $4,000.00 over four years of post-secondary education.

Lexi Grathwohl, a graduate of Cathedral High School, and Maria Shea, a graduate of Lakeville North High School, were the recipients of a $500.00 Citizens Bank Minnesota scholarship.  This is something that is offered as a random drawing to all high school seniors from the New Ulm and Lakeville area that completed the Citizens Real Life Skillz online classes.

Each year, Citizens awards two or more high school seniors with scholarships.  The scholarship program was developed to express our belief in the youth and their potential to make a difference in our community. Citizens is proud to invest in their future by promoting education and excellence.

Molly Hennig photo

Molly, daughter of Brian and Grace Hennig, will be attending Martin Luther College this coming fall, pursuing a degree in music and voice.

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Grant, son of Chuck Halvorson and Maureen Thielen, will be attending the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities this coming fall, pursuing a degree in environmental engineering.

Lexi Grathwohl

Lexi, daughter of Norman and Lisa Grathwohl, will be attending Southwest Minnesota State University this coming fall, pursuing a degree in exercise science.

Maria Shea

Maria, daughter of Julie and Bill Shea, will be attending Minnesota State University, Mankato this coming fall, pursuing a degree in elementary education.

For more information about the Citizens Bank Minnesota Scholarships Click Here

Minnesota Bankers Association Honors Citizens Bank Minnesota

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EDEN PRAIRIE, MN – The Minnesota Bankers Association (MBA) recently recognized twenty-one Minnesota banks for their community involvement. Citizens Bank Minnesota was one of twenty-one banks honored for their community involvement. Citizens employees volunteered over 5,800 hours on behalf of their bank for organizations such as American Cancer Society, United Way Day of Caring, Adopt-a-Family, Junior Achievement, National Teach Children to Save Day, local school programs, churches and non-profits. Citizens is also proud of being awarded top fundraising team for the American Cancer Society’s Brown County Relay for Life event raising $24,425.00. Citizens continues to support local businesses through its Go Local initiative that encourages its employees to shop locally first for all their purchases.

MBA President/CEO Joe Witt congratulated the recipients and stated “This extraordinary level of volunteer participation by Minnesota banks demonstrates their deep commitment to the communities they serve. In addition to providing the capital that helps families and local businesses thrive, the banking industry’s record of supporting local programs is second to none. The MBA is pleased to recognize these 21 banks for their commitment to making a real difference in their local communities.”

The Minnesota Bankers Association is the state’s largest trade association devoted exclusively to the representation of commercial banks. The MBA was founded in 1889 and represents 95% of Minnesota’s chartered banks. The MBA is proud to support our member banks as they work to ensure vital communities throughout the state. For more information, please visit our website at www.minnbankers.com.

September is College Savings Month

Little Girl dreaming of graduation

Did you know that September is College Savings Month? It’s never too early (or too late!) to start saving for college! Here are a few general savings tips:

  • Start saving as early as you can. However old your children are, if you want to help fund their college education, start saving. It is never too early, or too late, to start saving for your child’s college.
  • Find more ways to save: Analyze your spending to see if there’s anything you can cut out to increase your savings. Finding ways to save and making cuts can really add up over time.
  • Automate your savings:The simplest way to start saving is to make it easier on yourself. See if you’re able to automatically deposit a portion of your paycheck into a college account or any savings account for that matter.
  • Prioritize your finances:The world doesn’t stop for college savings, nor does the rest of your financial needs. You need to pay off any debt, especially any credit cards or other high-interest debt. You also need topay off your own student loans (if you have any), establish an emergency fund for yourself, and save for retirement as well.

What happens when you just can’t financially help?

Sometimes the dream of paying for your child’s education is just not within your reach. Or maybe, like some parents, you want your child to pay for their own education to learn how to stand on their own feet and become independent. Either way, there are still things you can do to reduce their student loan debts and how much they’ll have to pay.

  • Motivate them in high school.Work hard to encourage them and keep them motivated during high school. The better grades they have, the more likely they’ll be able to receive scholarships. High grades can also mean they’re eligible for advanced placement courses, which can count toward college credits and therefore reduce the amount of tuition owed. Also encourage them to volunteer and participate in extracurricular activities to increase their chances of getting scholarships.
  • Encourage them to work through high school.As soon as they can get a job, encourage them to do so. This may require your participation, such as driving them to work or helping them fill out taxes when that time rolls around. Have a discussion about what percentage of each paycheck should be put toward college.
  • Help them apply for scholarships.When the time comes, encourage and help them to apply for scholarships.
  • Teach them about student loans.A vital thing you can do for your child is take the time to teach them about financial aid, student loans, what they’ll owe upon graduation, and what that will mean for them in the long run. Help them keep track of financial aid deadlines and make sure your child fills out the FAFSA. This conversation can lead to ways to reduce their student loans while still in school, such as encouraging them to stick to a budget, not misuse student loans, and picking an affordable college to start with.

Citizens Bank Minnesota does have a scholarship opportunity where we award two or more scholarships each year to local graduating seniors who will be attending post-secondary education. Scholarship America performs the selection process and administration. This program was instituted at Citizens as a way to show our commitment to the community and our belief in today’s youth. Citizens plans to continue this tradition for years to come!

You can find out more information about our scholarship at http://www.citizensmn.com/personal/real-life-investors

By: Sarah Seifert, Marketing Assistant/Youth Club Coordinator

Sources: Thesimpledollar.com

Citizens Bank Minnesota Awards Scholarships

Emily Grob, a graduate of New Ulm High School, and Martin Halvorson, a graduate of Lakeville South High School, were recently presented with the Citizens Bank Minnesota’s fifteenth annual scholarship awards.  These scholarships are part of the Community Bankers Scholarship Program TM.  Both of these students received a $1,000.00 scholarship that is renewable for a potential value of $4,000.00 over four years of post-secondary education.

Alexa Diersen, a graduate of Minnesota Valley Lutheran High School, and Lucas Elias, a graduate of Lakeville North High School, were the recipients of a $500.00 Citizens Bank Minnesota scholarship.  This is something that is offered as a random drawing to all high school seniors from the New Ulm and Lakeville area that completed the Citizens Real Life Skillz online classes.

Each year, Citizens awards two or more high school seniors with scholarships.  The scholarship program was developed to express our belief in the youth and their potential to make a difference in our community. Citizens is proud to invest in their future by promoting education and excellence.

Emily Grob

Emily, daughter of Michael and Wendy Grob, will be attending the University of North Dakota this coming fall, pursuing a degree in pre-med and biochemistry.

Martin Halvorson

Martin, son of Chuck Halvorson and Maureen Thielen, will be attending the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities this coming fall, pursuing a degree in electrical engineering/computer science.

AlexaDiersen

Alexa, daughter of Greg and Kelly Diersen, will be attending Winona State University this coming fall, pursuing a degree in nursing.

Lucas Elias

Lucas, son of David and Patty Elias, will be attending the University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management this coming fall, pursuing a degree in business/engineering.

April 24, 2015 marked the 19th annual “Teach Children to Save Day”

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During the week of April 20th – 24th, several Citizens Bank Minnesota employees visited second grade classrooms in the New Ulm and Lakeville areas and connected with over 750 students, in 9 different schools, raising awareness on the importance of saving money at an early age, for “Teach Children to Save”.

“Teach Children to Save” is a national financial literacy program that organizes banker volunteers to help young people develop a savings habit early in life. Since the program started in 1997, more than 177,000 bankers have taught savings skills to some 6 million students. This year eighteen members of Congress also joined with participating bankers to co-host events!​

To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, we have the students play a game with Laffy Taffy.  After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank.  After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy.  After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with.  This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the Laffy Taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance.  They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future. The students are always ready to ask questions in regards to saving and the bank! And of course we leave a bucket of the candy with the teacher to pass out when she sees fit!

Citizens has a great youth Savings Force account with a Power Rewards Program. This program is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards!  It also includes receiving fun, educational newsletters, postcards for their birthdays and treat bags, and special promotions throughout the year. If you are interested in opening a savings account for your child or grandchild at Citizens, please stop in and talk with one of our Client Service Representatives today! You can also see details on our website at http://www.citizensmn.com/personal/the-savings-force.

By: Sarah Seifert, Marketing Assistant/Youth Club Coordinator

CITIZENS BANK MINNESOTA ‘TEACHES CHILDREN TO SAVE’

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April 11, 2014  marked the 18th annual Teach Children to Save Day

During the week of April 7th – 11th, several Citizens Bank Minnesota employees visited second grade classrooms in the New Ulm and Lakeville area and connected with over 500 students, raising awareness on the importance of saving money at an early age.  They also talked about where they can save their money – in a bank, or in their piggy banks at home.

To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, the students play a game with laffy taffy.  After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank.  After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy.  After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with.  This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the laffy taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance.  They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future.  The students are always ready to ask questions in regards to saving and the bank!

Looking for a few tips on raising money-smart kids?

  • Set the example of a responsible money manager by paying bills on time, being a conscientious spender and an active saver. Children tend to emulate their parents’ personal finance habits.
  • Talk openly about money with your kids. Communicate your values and experiences with money. Encourage them to ask you questions, and be prepared to answer them – even the tough ones.
  • Explain the difference between needs and wants, the value of saving and budgeting and the consequences of not doing so.
  • Open a savings account for your children and take them with you to make deposits, so they can learn how to be hands-on in their money management.
  • Let friends and family know about your child’s savings goal.  They’ll be more likely to give cash for special occasions, which means more trips to the bank.
  • Engage your community.  Many schools, banks and community organizations share your commitment to creating a money-savvy generation.  Engage a coalition of support to provide youth with the education they need to succeed.

Citizens has a great Savings Force account with a Power Rewards Program.  This program is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards!  It also includes receiving fun, educational newsletters and special promotions throughout the year. If you are interested in opening a savings account for your child or grandchild at Citizens, please stop in and talk with one of our Client Service Representatives today!

 

By: Sarah Seifert, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

National Teach Kids To Save Day

Juliana teach kids

National Teach Children to Save Day is April 23. Citizens Bank Minnesota is excited to once again go into our local schools and teach the second graders about saving. The day is aimed at raising awareness about the important role that banks and bankers play in helping young people develop lifelong savings habits.

One of the ways we help the students learn about saving is by discussing what they might save for, why it is important to save, and where they can save their money. To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, the students play a game with laffy taffy. After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank. After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy. After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with. This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the laffy taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance. They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future. The students then can ask questions in regards to saving and the bank. In the past, the students have been excited to talk about the security of the bank, specifically the vault and motion detectors!

Through Teach Children to Save, the students really gain a good insight into saving that we hope will stay with them through their lives.  If they don’t already have a savings account, we encourage the kids to stop into Citizens and open one up.  They will then join the Savings Force and receive educational newsletters and be involved in our Power Rewards Program, which is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards.

By: Kelly Blick, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

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