Archive for the ‘ Youth ’ Category

Citizens Bank Minnesota Awards Scholarships

Emily Grob, a graduate of New Ulm High School, and Martin Halvorson, a graduate of Lakeville South High School, were recently presented with the Citizens Bank Minnesota’s fifteenth annual scholarship awards.  These scholarships are part of the Community Bankers Scholarship Program TM.  Both of these students received a $1,000.00 scholarship that is renewable for a potential value of $4,000.00 over four years of post-secondary education.

Alexa Diersen, a graduate of Minnesota Valley Lutheran High School, and Lucas Elias, a graduate of Lakeville North High School, were the recipients of a $500.00 Citizens Bank Minnesota scholarship.  This is something that is offered as a random drawing to all high school seniors from the New Ulm and Lakeville area that completed the Citizens Real Life Skillz online classes.

Each year, Citizens awards two or more high school seniors with scholarships.  The scholarship program was developed to express our belief in the youth and their potential to make a difference in our community. Citizens is proud to invest in their future by promoting education and excellence.

Emily Grob

Emily, daughter of Michael and Wendy Grob, will be attending the University of North Dakota this coming fall, pursuing a degree in pre-med and biochemistry.

Martin Halvorson

Martin, son of Chuck Halvorson and Maureen Thielen, will be attending the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities this coming fall, pursuing a degree in electrical engineering/computer science.

AlexaDiersen

Alexa, daughter of Greg and Kelly Diersen, will be attending Winona State University this coming fall, pursuing a degree in nursing.

Lucas Elias

Lucas, son of David and Patty Elias, will be attending the University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management this coming fall, pursuing a degree in business/engineering.

April 24, 2015 marked the 19th annual “Teach Children to Save Day”

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During the week of April 20th – 24th, several Citizens Bank Minnesota employees visited second grade classrooms in the New Ulm and Lakeville areas and connected with over 750 students, in 9 different schools, raising awareness on the importance of saving money at an early age, for “Teach Children to Save”.

“Teach Children to Save” is a national financial literacy program that organizes banker volunteers to help young people develop a savings habit early in life. Since the program started in 1997, more than 177,000 bankers have taught savings skills to some 6 million students. This year eighteen members of Congress also joined with participating bankers to co-host events!​

To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, we have the students play a game with Laffy Taffy.  After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank.  After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy.  After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with.  This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the Laffy Taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance.  They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future. The students are always ready to ask questions in regards to saving and the bank! And of course we leave a bucket of the candy with the teacher to pass out when she sees fit!

Citizens has a great youth Savings Force account with a Power Rewards Program. This program is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards!  It also includes receiving fun, educational newsletters, postcards for their birthdays and treat bags, and special promotions throughout the year. If you are interested in opening a savings account for your child or grandchild at Citizens, please stop in and talk with one of our Client Service Representatives today! You can also see details on our website at http://www.citizensmn.com/personal/the-savings-force.

By: Sarah Seifert, Marketing Assistant/Youth Club Coordinator

CITIZENS BANK MINNESOTA ‘TEACHES CHILDREN TO SAVE’

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April 11, 2014  marked the 18th annual Teach Children to Save Day

During the week of April 7th – 11th, several Citizens Bank Minnesota employees visited second grade classrooms in the New Ulm and Lakeville area and connected with over 500 students, raising awareness on the importance of saving money at an early age.  They also talked about where they can save their money – in a bank, or in their piggy banks at home.

To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, the students play a game with laffy taffy.  After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank.  After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy.  After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with.  This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the laffy taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance.  They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future.  The students are always ready to ask questions in regards to saving and the bank!

Looking for a few tips on raising money-smart kids?

  • Set the example of a responsible money manager by paying bills on time, being a conscientious spender and an active saver. Children tend to emulate their parents’ personal finance habits.
  • Talk openly about money with your kids. Communicate your values and experiences with money. Encourage them to ask you questions, and be prepared to answer them – even the tough ones.
  • Explain the difference between needs and wants, the value of saving and budgeting and the consequences of not doing so.
  • Open a savings account for your children and take them with you to make deposits, so they can learn how to be hands-on in their money management.
  • Let friends and family know about your child’s savings goal.  They’ll be more likely to give cash for special occasions, which means more trips to the bank.
  • Engage your community.  Many schools, banks and community organizations share your commitment to creating a money-savvy generation.  Engage a coalition of support to provide youth with the education they need to succeed.

Citizens has a great Savings Force account with a Power Rewards Program.  This program is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards!  It also includes receiving fun, educational newsletters and special promotions throughout the year. If you are interested in opening a savings account for your child or grandchild at Citizens, please stop in and talk with one of our Client Service Representatives today!

 

By: Sarah Seifert, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

National Teach Kids To Save Day

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National Teach Children to Save Day is April 23. Citizens Bank Minnesota is excited to once again go into our local schools and teach the second graders about saving. The day is aimed at raising awareness about the important role that banks and bankers play in helping young people develop lifelong savings habits.

One of the ways we help the students learn about saving is by discussing what they might save for, why it is important to save, and where they can save their money. To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, the students play a game with laffy taffy. After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank. After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy. After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with. This is a good visual and interactive example for students to see the benefits of saving.

Following the laffy taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance. They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future. The students then can ask questions in regards to saving and the bank. In the past, the students have been excited to talk about the security of the bank, specifically the vault and motion detectors!

Through Teach Children to Save, the students really gain a good insight into saving that we hope will stay with them through their lives.  If they don’t already have a savings account, we encourage the kids to stop into Citizens and open one up.  They will then join the Savings Force and receive educational newsletters and be involved in our Power Rewards Program, which is geared towards saving money and getting good grades in school to earn rewards.

By: Kelly Blick, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

2012 Citizens Scholarship Winners

For the past 12 years, Citizens Bank Minnesota has provided local students the opportunity to receive a renewable $1,000 scholarship – up to $4,000 – to use towards their higher education as a full-time undergraduate at an accredited four-year college or university.

To apply for this scholarship, students must be clients of Citizens, have an open and active checking account, and attend the Real Life 101 Seminar.  The seminar discusses the next phase of these students’ financial lives: personal finance, insurance needs, managing their credit and their budgets, as well as what careers fit their personality types.  Students between 13-18 years old can attend at any point of their high school years, but can only apply for the scholarship during their senior year.

Citizens is pleased to announce the winners of the 2012 Citizens Bank Minnesota Scholarship: Minnesota Valley Lutheran’s Philip Biedenbender, son of Steven and Laurie Biedenbender, and New Ulm Cathedral’s John Hayes, son of Thomas and Patricia Hayes.

Citizens believes that supporting our local students through their education is a vital necessity to the future of our communities, and we are proud of the accomplishments these students have achieved so far in their young lives.  Citizens looks forward to what all of the scholarship winners will accomplish in the future!

For more information on the Citizens Bank Minnesota Scholarship, please visit: http://www.citizensmn.com/personal/youth-clubs/scholarship-program.html

By: Kelly Blick, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

Have you heard? The Savings Force just turned one!

Wait…what is the Savings Force?

It’s Lil’ C and Super Z, the superheroes who help Citizens Bank Minnesota’s young bankers become super savers.  They introduce children, ages 0-12, to the idea of saving through educational newsletters, events and the Power Rewards Program.

Earning Power Reward Points is the best way to show the children how saving works.  For each dollar they deposit into their savings account, they earn a Power Reward Point.  It’s that simple!

There are other ways to earn points, too.  During the child’s birthday month, they receive a postcard from Lil’ C and Super Z that can be redeemed at their local Citizens branch for 50 Power Reward Points.

Lil’ C and Super Z want to encourage the children to try their best in school, too.  They can bring in their report cards and earn Power Reward Points for their good grades.

As the children save their Power Reward Points, they can redeem them for prizes, ranging from bouncy balls and finger puppets to DVDs and iTunes gift cards.  Prize levels start at 100 points and go up to 1,000 points, so reaching one of these levels is an attainable goal.  Plus, Lil’ C and Super Z love to send prizes to their super savers!

Lil’ C and Super Z also gave away some great prizes at their birthday party held in conjunction with the Minnesota Twins Home Opener on Monday, April 9.  They asked the children to bring in their piggy banks, step up to the home plate by each teller station and save their money.  They met their goal of saving over $500!

The Savings Force looks forward to helping the young bankers of Citizens continue to learn to save in fun ways!

By: Kelly Blick, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

National Teach Children to Save Day

National Teach Children to Save Day is April 24. Citizens Bank Minnesota is excited to once again go into our local schools and teach the second graders about saving.  The day is aimed at raising awareness about the important role that banks and bankers play in helping young people develop lifelong savings habits.

One of the ways we help the students learn about saving is by discussing what they might save for, why it is important to save, and where they can save their money.  To emphasize how banks are a better place to save their money than at home in their piggy banks, the students play a game with Laffy Taffy.  After the class is divided into two, they each take turns to “make a deposit” with their taffy, one group to their piggy bank, the other to the bank.  After the first round, the students who deposited their taffy at the bank receive interest in the form of more taffy.  After five rounds, the bank students have an overflowing bucket of taffy, while the piggy bank students have only the amount of taffy they started with.  This is a good visual and interactive example to help students understand the benefits of saving.

Following the Laffy Taffy game, the students talk about different ways they can add to their savings accounts, such as receiving money as a gift, earning money from jobs at home, or their allowance.  They also talk about their savings goals, such as buying video games or toys now, or saving for a car or college in the future.  The students then can ask questions in regards to saving and the bank.  In the past, the students have been excited to talk about the security of the bank, specifically the vault and motion detectors!

Through Teach Children to Save, the students really gain a good insight into saving that we hope will stay with them throughout their lives.  If they don’t already have a savings account, we encourage the kids to stop into Citizens and open one up.  They will then join the Savings Force and receive educational newsletters and be involved in our Power Rewards Program, which is geared toward saving money to earn rewards.

By: Kelly Blick, Marketing Assistant/Youth Coordinator

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