Posts Tagged ‘ Citizens Agency ’

May Your Christmas Be Merry & Bright!

Citizens Bank Minnesota would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

We’ve put together a fun Christmas Greeting video for you to watch. We hope you enjoy it as much as we enjoyed putting it together!

Citizens Delivers Random Acts of Kindness to 425 People

September 18-22, 2017 was Minnesota Bankers Community Impact Week, in which Citizens Bank Minnesota was a proud participant. Across the state, 95 banks and over 250 branches joined forces to serve their local communities. Citizens chose to split its staff of 94 into 13 teams and perform Random Acts of Kindness throughout the communities they serve. Citizens employees were able to impact 11 organizations and over 425 individuals. Some of the acts performed were providing healthy snacks to Davita Dialysis Center in New Ulm, serving hot dogs to the community in Lafayette and bringing a football jersey along with snacks to a local student who was recently hurt while playing football.
Launched by the Minnesota Bankers Association, the Community Impact Week creates an opportunity for banks to highlight the many volunteer opportunities available to help build stronger local communities. Citizens and their employees were proud to be a part of this effort!

Check out our video to see the businesses and individuals that Citizens impacted this year!

Harvest Safety – Part 2 of 2

TRACTOR AND SUNSETAvoid Harvesting Hazards. Know the drill. Knowing how to identify hazards is only the first step. Once you identify them, you have to learn to manage them safely or avoid them altogether. Stop and think about possible hazards while you’re operating the equipment. Be alert. Ask questions. Here are a few serious harvesting hazards to avoid:
• Avoid entanglement. Every combine or baler gets a plugged intake area occasionally. This area is also known as a pull-in point, and it can grab you in an instant. To avoid entanglement:
− Operate the equipment with care and attention.
− Ensure all protective guards and shields are securely in place.
− Clear plugged equipment only after the power is turned off and the key is in your pocket.
− Don’t overestimate your ability to react – entanglement injuries happen very quickly.
− Decrease the incidence of plugged machines through regular maintenance, late-season
weed control, and by operating during optimal conditions.
− In wet field conditions, wait a few hours or an extra day, if possible, to reduce plugging.
− If you must harvest in marginal conditions, expect crops to plug the equipment and allow extra time to unplug it.

• Don’t slip up. Most people recognize the entanglement hazard. Few realize that many more injuries are related to slips and falls around farm machines. During an average workday, you might have to mount and dismount from the combine dozens of times. The top of an average combine is 12 to 16 feet high. The operator’s platform is usually 6 to 8 feet high. Falls from these heights can cause serious injuries. If you are fatigued or careless, the likelihood of a fall dramatically increases.

Then there’s the slip factor. Ladders and platforms are often painted metal. They’re
slippery in normal conditions – treacherous when wet, muddy, icy or coated in crop
residue.

To prevent painful falls:
− Keep platforms free of tools or other objects.
− Clean ladders, steps and platforms regularly.
− Wear well-fitting, comfortable shoes with non slip soles.
− Use the grab bars when mounting or dismounting.
− Find a stable position from which to refuel or perform maintenance.
− Use three points of contact when getting in or out of machinery – one hand/two feet or
two hands/ one foot.
− Don’t underestimate the impact of fatigue, stress, drugs, alcohol, or age on your stability.

The Last Word
Harvest is a productive time. The pressure may be exhilarating, but it also creates serious stress. This can only mean one thing: an increased risk of injury. To prevent injury and reap the benefits of the harvest you’re working so hard at; take responsibility for your own safety. Injuries happen when you take shortcuts in performing routine tasks, work while mentally or physically fatigued, or fail to follow safety guidelines.

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Renters Insurance For College Students

Renters Insurance for College Students

Renters Insurance Should Be Considered For College Students Living on Their Own
College students renting an off-campus apartment or house while away at school should consider purchasing renters insurance to protect their personal property, such as a computer, television, stereo, bicycle or furniture in the event that it is damaged, destroyed or stolen.
Even if a student is a dependent under his or her parent’s insurance, the student’s personal property may not be covered. Parents should check their policy or contact their insurance agent to see if renters insurance is right for their son or daughter who is away at school.

What is Renters Insurance?
Renters insurance protects your personal property against damage or loss, and insures you in case someone is injured while on your property. If you live in a rented apartment, house or condominium, your landlord’s insurance does not cover your personal property in the event that it is stolen or damaged as a result of a fire, theft or other unexpected circumstance.
College students living in off-campus housing are ideal candidates for needing renters insurance, since many students bring thousands of dollars’ worth of personal items, such as electronics, a computer, textbooks, clothes, furniture, and a bicycle, with them to school. It is the renter’s responsibility to provide coverage for these valuable items.

Basic Options
Most renters’ insurance policies provide two basic types of coverage: personal property and liability. Personal property coverage pays to repair or replace personal belongings if they are damaged, destroyed, or stolen. This is the most commonly purchased renters’ policy. Liability insurance provides coverage against a claim or lawsuit resulting from bodily injury or property damage to others caused by an accident while on the policyholder’s property.

Shop for the Right Coverage
Another important factor to look for when shopping for renters insurance is “actual cash value” vs. “replacement cost” coverage.
Actual cash-value coverage will reimburse the renter for the cost of the personal property at the time of the claim, minus the deductible. It’s important to account for depreciation when considering this coverage option. For example, if a stereo system were stolen from an apartment fi ve years after the stereo was purchased, the policyholder would be reimbursed for the current value of the system.
Replacement cost coverage, on the other hand, will reimburse the full value of the new stereo system after you purchase the new system and submit your receipts. While the up-front cost is greater, you are more likely to receive accurate compensation for your possessions.

Parents’ Homeowners Insurance
As a parent with your own homeowners’ policy, you may want to contact your agent and ask if your child will be covered while they are away at school. Some companies might still cover your child’s belongings under your policy depending on their age and student status. However, you will still be responsible for your deductible under your policy.
Other Points of Interest Regarding Renters Insurance
When a claim is reported, the insurance company will ask the policyholder for proof of purchase for all items reported on the claim. A comprehensive list of possessions, including purchase prices, model numbers and serial numbers, will suffice. It also is a good idea to take photos or video footage of any personal possessions for documentation, making sure it is stored in a secure, off-site location.

Article Courtesy Of: Fairmont Farmers Mutual Insurance Company

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Renters Insurance/Tenant Insurance

Renters Insurance post

There are many individuals and businesses out there that own multiple dwellings and rent them out to tenants.  These individuals and businesses will want to cover these dwellings under a dwelling/fire and/or a commercial policy if it fits.

This policy will cover the dwelling itself, any detached structures, personal property in the dwelling that is owned by the owner can have coverage added, loss of rents and landlord liability and medical payments to others coverage.  In the case of a wind storm, a hail storm, etc. the structure and personal property that is damaged would then be covered under such policy.

The agent will do a replacement cost of the dwelling and any detached structures to ensure that they are covering the dwelling at 80-100% of replacement cost value.  The replacement cost value is the cost it would be today to replace the dwelling with like materials and labor.  The agent and insured want to verify that these numbers are adequate, otherwise, in the case of a claim and the house is underinsured, there can be a coinsurance penalty.

When looking at the other side of things and who is actually occupying the dwelling(s), the tenant should have a renter’s policy in place.  This renter’s policy will cover the personal property of the renter, additional living expense and loss of rents coverage, personal liability and medical payments.

It should be both the owner’s duty and the renter’s duty to make certain that they both have the correct coverages in place.  Also, the owner should confirm that the rental contract requires that the tenant must carry renter’s insurance in the case of a claim so if there is a claim, a fire for instance, and the tenant is found liable for the fire, the renter’s policy would come into place for coverage.  The owner does not want to have the misfortune of having a claim by the tenant who has no coverage and who does damage to their dwelling.

In short, if you are a landlord, make sure that you and your tenants have the necessary insurance coverage in place and that you ask for renewal policies each year to have on file.

By: Nick Hage, Citizens Agency Manager/Insurance Agent

Investment and Insurance products:

  • Are Not Insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency
  • Are Not deposits of or guaranteed by a Bank or any Bank Affiliate
  • May lose value

Citizens Bank Minnesota employees donate $3,052.00 worth of gifts to families in need.

 

Citizens Bank Minnesota's New Ulm main office provided gifts for a local family in need.

Citizens Bank Minnesota's Lafayette staff provided Christmas food boxes for local families in need.

Lafayette staff prepare Christmas food boxes for local families in need.

Citizens Bank Minnesota employees were excited to help families in need this Holiday Season. Our main office in New Ulm as well as two branch locations in La Salle and Lakeville each adopted an area family. Money was donated by employees, raised through a bake sale and free-will donation luncheons, and with a bank match it made it possible to donate $3,052.00 in gifts for these families. We were able to fulfill all the needs the families had, plus more!

Citizens Bank Minnesota, Lafayette Branch, also participated in our Adopt-a-Family project.  Together with the New Ulm Jaycees and guidance from Nick Peterson, an Ag Lender in Lafayette who is involved with the Jaycee’s Christmas Food Basket Project, the Lafayette staff was able to help families in need of food for the Christmas Holiday by collecting money from employees and from fundraising.  With a matching donation from the bank, they were able to assemble 10 Christmas Food Baskets consisting of two boxes full of food, including a large ham.  The Jaycees work with the New Ulm Food shelf and families may sign up if they would like a Christmas Food Basket. The Lafayette staff distributed the baskets and enjoyed seeing the faces of grateful recipients, both young and old.

We were happy to help these families who would have had an otherwise difficult time purchasing the needed items themselves. It was also a great way to remember what the Holidays are truly all about!

Do I Need Renters Insurance in College?

renter-insurance-in-college

Updated: July 2016

When you’re packing for college, you may be thinking about your class schedule and late night pizzas with friends. Someone making off with your laptop or a dorm fire are probably not what you’re envisioning about the campus experience. But since you may be bringing some expensive stuff with you — a television, speakers, clothing and a smartphone — it’s a good idea to make sure these things are protected before you leave home, just in case.

Whether you’re living in the dorm or an off-campus apartment, it’s important to have coverage for all those things that help you keep up with classes and make your living space feel like home. How to help protect your stuff, though, typically depends on where you’re living.

Dorm Life

If you’re living in a dorm or other campus housing, your belongings may be covered under your parents’ homeowners or renters insurance policy. You’ll want to check with your agent to make sure, but the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) says that students who are younger than 26 and living on campus may be covered through their parents’ policy.

It can be a good idea to know the policy’s coverage limits for personal property. The Insurance Information Institute(III) says some policies limit coverage for belongings while they are away from the policyholder’s home. This is often referred to as “off-premises coverage.” For example, if your parents’ policy provides $100,000 worth of coverage for belongings, but limits that coverage to 10 percent for items that are off-premises, it may provide up to $10,000 for items away from their home, including belongings you bring to school.

It’s also important to note that certain items, such as a laptop, may have coverage limits. If the policy’s limits aren’t enough to cover the items you’ll be bringing to school, the III says your parents may be able to add scheduled personal property coverage, sometimes referred to as a “floater,” to their homeowners or renters insurance policy to help cover certain valuable possessions.

Off-Campus Housing

If you’ll be living in off-campus housing, the III cautions that your parents’ insurance will probably not extend to any belongings you bring with you (although you’ll want to check with your agent to be certain). Your own renters insurance policy may be a good way to help protect your belongings should they be stolen or damaged by a covered loss. (Covered events are often described as “perils” in insurance terms. Read your policy to learn what risks it may cover, such as theft or fire.)

A renters policy will also likely provide liability coverage, which may help prevent you from paying out of pocket if you are found legally responsible for someone else’s injuries or accidental damage to their property (including your landlord’s).

The III recommends asking your agent about coverage limits, as well as whether you may benefit from additional coverage for certain valuables.

Hopefully you and your stuff stay safe and sound while you’re running to and from classes, but it may be a good idea to keep a home inventory — it can be a big help if you ever need to file a claim. Knowing you have coverage for your stuff can bring some peace of mind and help you focus on a great college experience.

Article courtesy of: http://www.allstate.com

 

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