Posts Tagged ‘ Technology ’

Citizens Introduces Mobile Wallet

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Now you can load your Citizens Bank Minnesota Mastercard® Debit Card into your Mobile Wallet, make it your default card and simply Tap – Pay – Done!

What is a Mobile Wallet?

A mobile wallet is a way to carry your debit card or credit card information in a digital form on your mobile device. Instead of using your physical card to make a purchase, you can pay with your smartphone, tablet or smartwatch.

You can use your Citizens Mastercard® Debit Card with any of these trusted wallets: Apple Pay, Google Pay, Samsung Pay and Masterpass.

How Mobile Wallets Work

  1. Download the mobile wallet app (or it may already be built into your mobile device).
  2. Add your credit card or debit card information to the mobile wallet.
  3. When you check out at participating merchants, access the mobile wallet and choose your card. If you’re making an in-store purchase, just hold your mobile device at the terminal, over the Near Field Communication (NFC) reader.

You can learn more about Mobile Wallets on our website: www.citizensmn.bank/personal/mobile-wallets

We have videos about the Top 5 Reasons WHY you should use a Mobile Wallet!  They are informational and entertaining, and you can view them all by clicking on the links below.

Reason #1 – Enhanced Security

Reason #2 – Organization

Reason #3 – Reduce Wear & Tear

Reason #4 – Convenience

Reason #5 – No More Pesky Forms

By: Sarah Seifert, Digital Marketing Coordinator

I Bought What?! Enroll in Text Alerts!

shutterstock_387607450Don’t get caught off-guard by fraudulent activity on your debit card! With Citizens Bank Minnesota’s MasterCard Debit Card, you can enroll to receive FREE* smsGuardian text alerts for your card activity! This is a great tool for fraud prevention and detection.

*Message and data rates may apply

 

Enroll in smsGuardian Text Alerts today!

Enrollment must be completed for each card number.  If at any time your debit card number or cell phone number change, you will need to re-enroll with updated information.

Alerts will be sent for the following:

  • Out of state transactions
  • International transactions
  • Card not present and online purchases
  • Authorizations greater than $300.00
  • 8 or more transactions in 24 hours
  • Declined authorization attempts

If you receive an alert for a transaction or attempt that was not initiated by you and you believe to be fraudulent, reply to the text with the code provided in the alert and your card will be shut down immediately.  If you have questions regarding the alert or need additional information, contact our Citizens Connection Department at 1-800-549-0194 available Monday thru Friday 7:30am – 5:00 pm and Saturday 9am – 12pm.

By: Melissa Bergeman, Citizens Connection Manager/Complaint Resolution Officer

SAFETY TIPS FOR MOBILE DEVICES

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Stay #CyberAware While On the Go

Your mobile devices – including smartphones, laptops and tablets – are always within reach everywhere you go, whether for work, travel or entertainment. These devices make it easy to connect to the world around you, but they can also pack a lot of info about you and your friends and family, like your contacts, photos, videos, location and health and financial data. It’s important to use your mobile safely.

The 1st step is to STOP. THINK. CONNECT.

STOP: make sure security measures are in place. THINK: about the consequences of your actions and behaviors online. CONNECT: and enjoy your devices with more peace of mind.

PERSONAL INFORMATION IS LIKE MONEY. VALUE IT. PROTECT IT.

  • Secure your devices: Use strong passwords or touch ID features to lock your devices. These security measures can help protect your informa on if your devices are lost or stolen and keep prying eyes out.
  • Think before you app: Information about you, such as the games you like to play, your contacts list, where you shop and your location, has value – just like money. Be thoughtful about who gets that information and how it’s collected through apps.
  • Now you see me, now you don’t: Some stores and other locations look for devices with WiFi or Bluetooth turned on to track your movements while you are within range. Disable WiFi and Bluetooth when not in use.
  • Get savvy about WiFi hotspots: Public wireless networks and hotspots are not secure, which means that anyone could potentially see what you are doing on your mobile device while you are connected. Limit what you do on public WiFi and avoid logging in to key accounts like email and financial services on these networks. Consider using a virtual private network (VPN) or a personal/mobile hotspot if you need a more secure connection on the go.

    KEEP A CLEAN MACHINE:

  • Keep your mobile devices and apps up to date: Your mobile devices are just as vulnerable as your PC or laptop. Having the most up-to-date security software, web browser, operating system and apps is the best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats.
  • Delete when done: Many of us download apps for specific purposes, such as planning a vacation, and no longer need them afterwards, or we may have previously downloaded apps that are no longer useful or interesting to us. It’s a good security practice to delete all apps you no longer use.

Article courtesy of StopThinkConnect.org

Created by the National Cyber Security Alliance

Made possible in whole by a grant fron the Digital Trust Foundation

Are You Ready to Leave Your Credit Cards at Home … and Pay by Smartphone?

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Paying for purchases by smartphone is becoming increasingly viable. Three major companies now enable consumers to buy goods at participating merchants with their credit or debit card by just waving a smartphone over the payment terminal. In fact, a major smartphone manufacturer recently teamed up with many banks and merchants to make the service available to anyone buying the newest version of its smartphone. What should you know about using your smartphone to pay in a store or a restaurant?

You need the right equipment. Your smartphone must contain a contactless or “NFC” (near field communication) computer chip that allows it to “talk” to the payment terminal via a wireless connection, as well as a digital wallet to store your payment card information. If you are buying a new smartphone, you can ask the salesperson if it has an NFC chip. For a phone you already have, check the “settings” menu and look for “NFC.” Your phone may already have a digital wallet feature. You can also download one through an app store or other online marketplace.

You have to load your credit or debit card information onto the phone. The setup procedure can be as easy as taking a picture of the front and back of the card with the mobile wallet application. The app will then send it to your bank for approval and to confirm that it’s really you. Some mobile wallets may allow consumers to load “loyalty” cards from favorite retailers. You may also receive store or restaurant coupons or other offers through your phone, based in part on your recent purchase history with the company.

Most merchants that accept mobile payments are large national chains, but smaller stores are beginning to sign up. A merchant must first install card terminals that accept contactless payments; they look different than the swipe terminals you are used to and display the symbol shown on the left.

As with any electronic transaction, pay attention to security issues. According to Jeff Kopchik, a Senior Policy Analyst at the FDIC, “Many security experts believe that mobile payments are more secure than swiping your magnetic stripe credit card because the mobile service keeps your credit number in encrypted form and does not transmit it to the merchant. But you still should make sure your phone is protected, such as with a password, so it cannot be accessed by a thief. Some of the newest smartphones use fingerprint readers to control access, which can be secure and convenient.”

Also make sure your phone “times out” and re-locks itself after it isn’t used for a short period of time. If you lose your smartphone, notify the bank or other issuer of any credit or debit cards that may be loaded on the phone.

“Remember that if there is a problem with a transaction, you will receive the same federal protections that otherwise apply to the underlying payment source,” noted FDIC Senior Policy Analyst Elizabeth Khalil. “For example, if the transaction drew on a credit card for payment, you will be protected by the same laws and regulations that cover credit cards.”

To learn more, start by contacting your smartphone service provider or credit card issuer.

Article courtesy of FDIC Consumer News

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